December 4th, 2006

Chris Keeley

Jeffrey Milstein: Aircraft

this project has led Mr. Milstein to LAX where the runway meets the edge of the airport

Jeffrey Milstein: Aircraft



http://www.jeffreymilstein.com/Airplane1.html

Jeffrey Milstein: Aircraft. "...An ongoing project exploring the typology of aircraft." More Works by Jeffrey Milstein at Paul Kopeikin Gallery in Los Angeles, CA. "...His large-scale photographs are not of model airplanes nor are they retouched. His passion for this project has led Mr. Milstein to LAX where the runway meets the edge of the airport. Outside the fenced field, he waits for approaching airplanes and snaps crystal clear shots of the incoming beasts. The planes become portraits as such, all seemingly leaning in for their close-up. In the photograph, the plane stands upright and alone as if in a studio with a backdrop, taking on a new persona."
Chris Keeley

Mandate for Peace is urging anti-war activists to call Congress today to urge lawmakers to immediate

Mandate for Peace Organizes Congressional Call-In
Here in this country, a new coalition of three dozen peace and social justice groups called Mandate for Peace is urging anti-war activists to call Congress today to urge lawmakers to immediately bring all troops home from Iraq. The coalition is supporting legislation proposed by Congressman Jim McGovern that would cut off funding for the war. 18 other Democrats have co-sponsored the legislation HR. 4232.
Chris Keeley

Emmett Kelly Jr., Clown, Dies at 83

Emmett Kelly Jr., Clown, Dies at 83

PHOENIX, Dec. 3 (AP) — Emmett Kelly Jr., who followed his father, one of the nation’s most famous clowns, into a career under the big top, died Wednesday near his home in Tombstone, Ariz. He was 83.

The cause was complications of pneumonia, said his daughter, CherryAnn Kelly-Knapp.

In 1960, with the makeup and blessing of his father, Mr. Kelly made his clown debut at the Circus Festival in Peru, Ind. Four years later, Eastman Kodak signed him to appear at the New York World’s Fair.

In addition to touring with several circuses, including his own, Mr. Kelly went on to entertain at more than 2,800 hospitals and was featured in print advertisements and television commercials.

Chris Keeley

Bansky Strikes Again

The prankish British artist known as Banksy has made Michael Jackson his target in a drawing inspired by Hansel and Gretel and prepared for Santa’s Ghetto, a 3,000-square-foot amusement arcade and art showcase that just opened in Central London, The Times of London reported. In the drawing, Mr. Jackson, seen kneeling in the doorway of a thatched woodland cottage and holding a candy cane, seems to be coaxing a girl and boy. Prices for Banksy’s works have been soaring. In October one of his images sold at auction for $125,000, and Angelina Jolie reportedly spent $400,000 on his work, the newspaper reported.
Chris Keeley

not alleging racism, and I’m not referring to Israel. I’m talking about Palestine

JIMMY CARTER ALOFT
by Nick Paumgarten
Issue of 2006-12-11
Posted 2006-12-04

Unlike Bill Clinton, a serial moocher of private jets, Jimmy Carter flies commercial. He shambles through airports, towing a wheelie bag. He and his retinue of Secret Service men bypass security, board the plane before the other passengers, and procure the first few rows. Prior to departure, he takes a window seat, in order to insulate himself from his fellow-travellers as they step onto the plane and glance at him with tight smiles that seem to indicate pride not only in their sudden proximity to an ex-President but also in their ability to refrain from making a fuss. Then, after the plane’s door has shut, he stands up and walks aft, shaking hands, posing for pictures, learning all the children’s names. “It saves me a lot of headaches,” he explained last week. “It saves me from having them come up to see me during the flight.” (It’s hard, but fun, to imagine Keith Richards doing this.) Carter returns to his row and takes an aisle seat—“Rosalynn likes the window”—and the plane leaves the gate.

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Chris Keeley

Mogadishu, Maine

Mogadishu, Maine
Posted 2006-12-11
This week in the magazine, William Finnegan writes about the Somalis of Lewiston. Here is a portfolio of photographs.
by Samantha Appleton





This week in the magazine, William Finnegan writes about the Somali community of Lewiston, Maine. In the past five years, some three thousand refugees from Somalia have flocked to this old mill town of thirty-six thousand residents.

View the slide show.

http://www.newyorker.com/online/covers/articles/061211on_onlineonly02

Chris Keeley

Blood Diamond

It’s a very big diamond, and a smuggler named Danny Archer (Leonardo DiCaprio), a white Rhodesian by birth and a former mercenary in Angola, wants it. In the capital city of Freetown, Maddy Bowen (Jennifer Connelly), a magazine reporter, tries to cozy up to Archer so that she can get the story of how the smuggling racket works.


WHAT IF?

by DAVID DENBY

Wishing things were otherwise.

Issue of 2006-12-11
Posted 2006-12-04



Africa breaks your heart—that’s the simplest and most persistent emotion that bursts out of such recent films as “Hotel Rwanda,” “The Constant Gardener,” “The Last King of Scotland,” and, now, “Blood Diamond,” the best and most enjoyable of this cycle of movies set against the background of civil wars, ethnic conflict, and Western meddling and exploitation. The earlier films, whatever their considerable virtues, were so thoroughly suffused with guilt over the West’s role in Africa’s misery that they left you chastened and hanging your head. But “Blood Diamond,” written by Charles Leavitt, from an idea that he developed with C. Gaby Mitchell, and directed by Edward Zwick, is essentially a romantic adventure story with politics in the background—an old-fashioned movie, I suppose, but exciting and stunningly well made. In Sierra Leone, in 1999, a civil war, fuelled by the trade in “blood diamonds”—in which gems are smuggled out of the country and sold to European buyers for arms money—has been raging for years, tearing up the countryside and pulling families apart. Solomon Vandy (Djimon Hounsou), a fisherman, loses his son to the guerrilla army, the Revolutionary United Front, which press-gangs the boy into service. The R.U.F. also forces Solomon to work in the diamond fields, where he pulls a pink stone from the marshy waters. He buries it, but word gets around.

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