November 27th, 2006

Chris Keeley

(no subject)

Former California state senator Tom Hayden is reporting that U.S. officials have secretly been involved in direct contacts with the Sunni armed resistance to explore a ceasefire in Iraq and even the possible replacement of the Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki's government with an interim one.

http://www.democracynow.org/print.pl?sid=06/11/27/1447210

Tom Hayden: Documents Reveal Secret Talks Between U.S. and Armed Iraqi Resistance

Monday, November 27th, 2006

http://www.democracynow.org/article.pl?sid=06/11/27/1447210

Former California state senator Tom Hayden is reporting that U.S. officials have secretly been involved in direct contacts with the Sunni armed resistance to explore a ceasefire in Iraq and even the possible replacement of the Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki's government with an interim one.

 


Sunni, Shiite and Kurdish leaders in Iraq's government called on Sunday for an end to the escalating sectarian conflict in Iraq. The joint appeal comes three days after over 200 people were killed in a siege on the Shiite neighborhood of Sadr City in what has been described as the deadliest attack on Iraqis since the war began. Hundreds of more Iraqis died over the weekend in reprisal killings.

The statement came after leading Sunni cleric Harith al-Dhari called for Arab countries to withdraw their recognition of the Iraqi government. Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki is coming under intense pressure from Sunni and Shia groups as he prepares for a summit in Jordan with President Bush this week. Shiite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr, has threatened to pull his followers from government and parliament if the proposed meeting goes ahead.

Meanwhile Iraqi President Jalal Talabani is due to fly to Iran to hold talks with Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad to discuss the situation in Iraq.

This comes as the New York Times is reporting that a draft report written by the Iraq Study Group is urging the US government to seek an aggressive regional diplomatic initiative that includes direct talks with Iran and Syria but sets no timetables for a military withdrawal.

There has been increasing debate within the United States over a possible US withdrawal. Meanwhile, the Huffington Post reported that US officials have secretly been involved in direct contacts with the Sunni armed resistance to explore a ceasefire. The article was written by Tom Hayden. A former California State Senator, Hayden was a leader of the anti-war movement during the Vietnam era. His latest article is Documents Reveal Secret Talks Between U.S. and Armed Iraqi Resistance.

 

  • Tom Hayden, a former California State Senator. He joins us on the line from California.
Chris Keeley

Robert Gates - advocated for President Reagan to bomb Nicaragua in 1984 in an effort to topple the S

Report: Robert Gates Advocated for Bombing of Nicaragua in 1984
Newly declassified government documents reveal that President Bush's pick to become the new Secretary of Defense – Robert Gates - advocated for President Reagan to bomb Nicaragua in 1984 in an effort to topple the Sandinista government. At the time Gates was deputy director of the CIA. In a memo to CIA Director William Casey, Gates wrote that the United States should do everything in its power short of invasion to bring down the Sandinista government. Gates has also been closely linked to the Iran-Contra scandal and the secret arming of Saddam Hussein. Nomination hearings for Gates are scheduled to begin on December 5.

Former Russian Spy Dies From Radioactive Poisoning
In Britain, a former Russian spy named Alexander Litvinenko has died under mysterious circumstances. A highly toxic radioactive substance was found in his urine leading authorities to believe he was poisoned. In a statement written on his deathbed, Litvinenko wrote a message to Russian President Vladimir Putin. It read: "You have succeeded in silencing one man, but the howl of protest from around the world will reverberate, Mr Putin, in your ears for the rest of your life." At the time of his death Litvinenko was investigating the death of Anna Politkovskaya, the Russian journalist and government critic who was shot at her Moscow apartment last month.

U.S. Stops Describing Americans as "Hungry"
In news from Washington, the Bush administration has stopped using the words "hunger" or "hungry" when describing the millions of Americans who can't afford to eat. Instead of suffering from hunger, the Agriculture Department now says these people are experiencing "very low food security." The USDA estimates that 12 percent of Americans or 35 million people could not put food on the table at least part of last year.

NYPD Proposes New Protest Rules
The New York police department has proposed new rules regulating public gatherings and protests. For the first time any group of 30 or more vehicles or bicycles would be required to obtain a police permit even if the group was obeying all traffic laws. The police proposal also would allow the arrest of any group of ten or more if any member of the group violated a traffic rule. The New York City Bar Association, New York Civil Liberties Union, United For Peace and Justice and other groups oppose the rule changes. The police department is holding a public hearing on the issue today.

Colorado Homeowner Fined For Christmas Wreath With Peace Signal
And in Colorado, a homeowners association is threatening to fine a resident for putting up a Christmas wreath with a peace sign on her house because it could be considered divisive. The owner of the wreath – Lisa Jensen – has vowed to keep the wreath up until after Christmas even though it will result in a fine of about one thousand dollars.

Chris Keeley

the Administration is toying with the idea of giving him another recess appointment (which would ena

IT’S HIS BIPARTY
by Hendrik Hertzberg
Issue of 2006-12-04
Posted 2006-11-27

According to the “Backwards Bush” countdown clock, available on the Web and in key-chain and desk-accessory form at selected novelty and toy stores around the nation, the sitting Administration in Washington will, as of this writing, be in office for another seven hundred and eighty-nine days, five hours, twenty-three minutes, and 36.2 seconds. But, if present trends continue, it’s going to feel like forever. On November 8th, the day after the midterm election, President Bush vowed to “find common ground,” “work with the new Congress in a bipartisan way,” and “overcome the temptation to divide this country between red and blue.” By way of launching “a new era of coöperation,” he announced a personnel change: Donald Rumsfeld was out as Secretary of Defense, to be replaced by Robert Gates, widely viewed as a member of the reality-based community. A day later, on November 9th, Bush had Nancy Pelosi, the incoming Speaker of the House, over for a nice lunch and an Oval Office photo op. “We’ve had a—I would call it a very constructive and very friendly conversation,” the President said, graciously. “We both extended the hand of friendship,” the Speaker-designate replied, graciously. “Thank you all,” the President concluded. Graciously.

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Chris Keeley

KILLING HABEAS CORPUS

KILLING HABEAS CORPUS
by JEFFREY TOOBIN
Arlen Specter’s about-face.
Issue of 2006-12-04
Posted 2006-11-27

President Abraham Lincoln suspended habeas corpus in Maryland on April 27, 1861, two weeks after the Confederate attack on the Union garrison at Fort Sumter. “Lincoln could look out his window at the White House and see Robert E. Lee’s plantation in Virginia,” Akhil Reed Amar, a professor at Yale Law School and the author of “America’s Constitution,” said. “He was also facing a rebellion of so-called Peace Democrats in Maryland, meaning there was a real chance that Washington would be surrounded and a real threat that the White House would be captured.” On Lincoln’s order, federal troops arrested Baltimore’s mayor and chief of police, as well as several members of the Maryland legislature, who were jailed so that they couldn’t vote to secede from the Union.

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Chris Keeley

The palimpsest contains about 120 printed pages of Archimedes text

ancient Greece as seen through the eyes of Hyperides, an important Athenian orator and politician from the fourth century B.C. What is slowly coming to light, scholars say, represents the most significant discovery of Hyperides text since 1891, illuminating some fascinating, time-shrouded insights into Athenian law and social history. 

A Layered Look Reveals Ancient Greek Texts

BALTIMORE — An ambitious international project to decipher 1,000-year-old moldy pages is yielding new clues about ancient Greece as seen through the eyes of Hyperides, an important Athenian orator and politician from the fourth century B.C. What is slowly coming to light, scholars say, represents the most significant discovery of Hyperides text since 1891, illuminating some fascinating, time-shrouded insights into Athenian law and social history.

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Chris Keeley

Regional Middle East Conference?

Subject:        Regional Middle East Conference?
Date:   Mon, 27 Nov 2006 17:52:22 EST
From:  Ray Close

Dear Friends:

    These are my personal predictions and expectations as we approach
the announcement of the Baker-Hamilton Iraq Study Group (ISG)
recommendations.   I wish it were a more optimistic picture.

    There is a seemingly endless list of Catch-22 situations in Iraq,
all increasingly intertwined with similarly intractable problems
throughout the entire Middle East, to which there simply are no
satisfactory answers. Nothing has brought home to me the extent and the
complexity of those problems more than the experience of working for
almost seven months now with the research committee supporting the James
Baker - Lee Hamilton Iraq Study Group in Washington.

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