October 26th, 2006

Chris Keeley

“trompe l’oeil grooviness, all ironed blond hair and girls wearing Blahniks.”

Andy Warhol ‘Giant’ Size” (Phaidon), 

 

The Selling of St. Andy

IN 1968 Andy Warhol placed an advertisement in The Village Voice: “I’ll endorse with my name any of the following: clothing, AC-DC, cigarettes, small tapes, sound equipment, ROCK ’N’ ROLL RECORDS, anything, film and film equipment, Food, Helium, Whips, MONEY!! love and kisses ANDY WARHOL. EL 5-9941.”

Warhol was not being coy. He was firming up his position as a sociocultural commercial institution, an artist who churned out silk-screen prints with assembly-line efficiency, a magazine publisher, a television personality, a filmmaker, social gadabout and self-styled prophet, who saw the erosion of the line between art and commerce. He was intent on turning his name and mystique into a brand.

Collapse )
Chris Keeley

some hospitals routinely drop off patients there -- eject them from a van, dazed or drugged and some

LAPD officials had photographed and videotaped ambulances from Los Angeles Metropolitan Medical Center allegedly dumping five people on skid row over the weekend 

L.A. hospitals dump patients on Skid Row

Los Angeles residents concerned about the sprawling human dumping ground that is Skid Row have long suspected that some hospitals routinely drop off patients there -- eject them from a van, dazed or drugged and sometimes still wearing hospital gowns, left to wander the streets and fend for themselves. This week, reports have surfaced which confirm those suspicions.

Over at blogging.la, Sean Bonner says,

On Monday LA Voice linked to this LA Times story stating that LAPD officials had photographed and videotaped ambulances from Los Angeles Metropolitan Medical Center allegedly dumping five people on skid row over the weekend and were calling it a major break. Since then both NPR and CNN have jumped on the story. What's worse is that of the 5 cases from this weekend, at least one of them was not even homeless and other reported they did not want to be taken to Skid Row. From CNN:

 

In one case, a man dropped off at Skid Row was in fact not homeless, said Smith, the LAPD captain. A police officer took him home and the man's family was "outraged," he said.

"Not only did they not know that he was discharged, but the fact that he had been brought to Skid Row instead of being brought home was what further outraged that family," Smith said at a news conference Tuesday.

Link. Photo (large size) by Matthew Logelin. (thanks B)

Reader comment: Bob says,

From Christine Pelisek's article in the LAWEEKLY, The Scourge of Skid Row: "Skid Row staph, or, more technically, a strain of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus that is sickening dozens of police officers, firefighters, health-care workers and homeless people."

posted by Xeni Jardin

Chris Keeley

Borat confronts, and when you think he goes to far, he goes futher, trespassing social borders

Borat = Mahir 2.0, but ees niiiice.


I am reluctantly, belatedly, but now utterly psyched about "Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan". When I first saw the schtick, all I could think was: he's lifting this from Mahir "WELCOME TO MY HOME PAGE! I KISS YOU!" Çağrı, (shaking his hand at the 2000 Webbies remains one of the most awesome moments of my life) .

But all that's changed now. And between Borat's MySpace hijinks, the tons and tons of looks-like-homemade promo videos... this is the first big-studio movie that seems like it's nailing online viral promotion perfectly. How smart was Fox? MySpace, which Fox bought for $580 million, doing online street promotion for Borat, a Fox property... this is no "Snakes on a Plane" accident.

The first four minutes of the Borat movie are now online. I scour YouTube daily for new Borat junk, but I'm sure there's tons of other stuff I haven't seen yet: Link. Kazakhstan, I surrender.

Hollywood, four words: Borat/Mahir buddy flick.

Collapse )
Chris Keeley

Joe Mills

Joeseph Mills

 

'Mills is a good enough picture maker to intrigue us and yet he is determined to keep us on the edge of unknowing.' - Anne Tucker Joseph Mills is a mid-career artist who has produced three distinct but interlocking bodies of work. He is best known for his surreal photomontages and collages, which were the subject of a one-person exhibition at The Corcoran Gallery in Spring 2003. The other two series are the ongoing affair, through photography, with his wife; and his black and white street work, the latter of which are featured in his first monograph, Inner City. People and their detritus are the focal points of these pictures. His subjects are not Washington¹s elite, but those whose situations in life are more peripheral and vulnerable: children, street prophets, the homeless and the mentally unstable. The resulting pictures are both about the inner city life he records and his own internal conflicts. Printed on outdated paper and heavily coated in amber toned varnish, Mills' photographs become objects, 'windows onto some world that really wasn't out there.' Published in association with Hemphill, Washington, DC; essay by Anne T

 

 

 

 

 

 

MILLS,JOSEPH                                                          : Inner City

http://www.nazraeli.com/nazraeli/frameset.html
Chris Keeley

Cheney said he agreed with a listener’s comment that terrorists should be dunked under water if it c

Cheney Appears to Confirm US Practices Waterboarding
Vice President Dick Cheney has apparently confirmed US interrogators engage in water-boarding – an outlawed practice that creates the sensation of drowning. The admission came during an interview on a right-wing North Dakota radio program on Tuesday. Cheney said he agreed with a listener’s comment that terrorists should be dunked under water if it could save American lives. Cheney added: “that's been a very important tool that we've had to be able to secure the nation." A spokesperson denied Cheney had endorsed waterboarding and said he was referring to broad interrogation procedures. Water-boarding is barred under international treaties that prohibit torture.
Chris Keeley

(no subject)

Photographer Ilias Bourgiotis’s new book reveals another side of the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens

By Vivienne Nilan - Kathimerini English Edition

Photographer Ilias Bourgiotis’s “Spectators” is an intriguing take on the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens. Turning his camera away from the predictable focus of attention - the athletes and their achievements - he focuses on the spectators.

Published by greekworks.com 2006 with a perceptive essay by New York Times international sports journalist George Vecsey, “Spectators” invites us to watch people watching.

Collapse )