October 14th, 2006

Chris Keeley

why polk and McGovern wrote thier book

why polk and McGovern wrote thier book

WHY WE WROTE THIS BOOK
    Events have proven that our government’s decision to invade and occupy Iraq was a calamitous mistake.  So far, more than 2500 young Americans have been killed; more than 16,000 have been wounded, half of them with disabilities that can never be repaired; and more than 40,000 have received severe psychological damage for which they, and we, will be paying for decades to come.  As bad as these results of the war have been, they are just the beginning. The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center has learned that perhaps one in every 10 – about 50,000 -- returning soldiers has suffered a concussion whose effects -- memory loss, severe headaches and confused thinking -- will linger throughout his or her life.  Exposure to depleted uranium is expected to add thousands of more patients, many of whom will develop cancer, to hospitals run by the Department of Veterans Affairs.
    No one knows how many Iraqi civilians we have killed.  Estimates run from 30,000 to 100,000.  Since Iraq has a total population of less than 10 percent of America’s, even the lowest  estimate means that virtually every Iraqi has a relative, neighbor, or friend whose death he or she blames on us.  A whole society has been crippled and may not recover for a generation or more. President George W. Bush and his team originally told us that we invaded Iraq in search of weapons of mass destruction that were an “imminent threat” to the United States.  When no such weapons were found, we were told that our army had invaded Iraq to bring democracy. Military force may change a regime, but it cannot create democracy.
    President Bush and his team have also told us – are still telling us – that they sent and want to keep our army in Iraq to destroy terrorism.  But, as we now know – and as they knew then – Iraq had nothing to do with the 9/11 terrorist attacks on America.  Our war against Iraq is not reducing terrorism and making us safe.  Rather, it is breeding terrorists in large and increasing numbers and giving them a base of operations among people who now hate our country.  The longer we occupy Iraq, the greater will be the danger to America.
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Chris Keeley

Another trait of Warhol’s was that he fanatically tried to keep or record everything that ever happe

Another trait of Warhol’s was that he fanatically tried to keep or record everything that ever happened in his vicinity, from junk mail in “time capsules” to small talk to newspaper front pages and movie star publicity shots to 24 hours of the Empire State Building.



Rock ‘n’ Roll High School

CBGB’S shuts down this weekend.

There’s not too much left to say about the character of the joint. It’s the most famous rock ’n’ roll club in the world, the most famous that there ever has been, and it’s just as famously a horrendous dump. It’s the archetypal, the ur, dim and dirty, loud, smelly and ugly nowhere little rock ’n’ roll club. There’s one not much different from it in every burg in the country.

Only, like a lot of New York, CBGB’s is more so, way more so. And of course, for three or four years in the mid-70’s, it housed the most influential cluster of bands ever to grow up — or to implicitly reject the concept of growing up — under one roof.

On practically any weekend from 1974 to 76 you could see one or more of the following groups (here listed in approximate chronological order) in the often half-empty 300-capacity club: Television, the Ramones, Suicide, the Patti Smith Group, Blondie, the Dictators, the Heartbreakers, Talking Heads, Richard Hell and the Voidoids, and the Dead Boys. Not to mention some often equally terrific (or equally pathetic) groups that aren’t as well remembered, like the Miamis and the Marbles and the Erasers and the Student Teachers. Nearly all the members of these bands treated the club as a headquarters — as home. It was a private world. We dreamed it up. It flowered out of our imaginations.

How often do you get to do that? That’s what you want as a kid, and that’s what we were able to do at CBGB’s. It makes me think of that Elvis Presley quotation: “When I was a child, ladies and gentlemen, I was a dreamer. I read comic books, and I was the hero of the comic book. I saw movies, and I was the hero in the movie. So every dream I ever dreamed has come true a hundred times.” We dreamed CBGB’s into existence.

The owner of the club, Hilly Kristal, never said no. That was his genius. Though it’s dumb to use the word genius about what happened there. It was all a dream. Many of us were drunk or stoned half our waking hours, after all. The thing is, we were young there. You don’t get that back. Even children know that. They don’t want their old stuff thrown away. Everything should be kept. I regret everything I’ve ever thrown away.

CBGB’s was like a big playhouse, site of conspiracies, orgies, delirium, refuge, boredom, meanness, jealousy, kindness, but most of all youth. Things felt and done the first time are more vivid. CBGB’s is where many things were felt with that vividness. That feeling is the real identity of the club, to me. And it’s horrible, or at least seriously sad, to lose it. But then, apparently, we aren’t really going to lose it.

CBGB’s is going to be dismantled and reconstructed as an exhibit in Las Vegas, like Elvis. I like that. A lot. I really hope it happens as intended.

It’s occurred to me that Hilly’s genius passivity is something he has in common with Andy Warhol. Another trait of Warhol’s was that he fanatically tried to keep or record everything that ever happened in his vicinity, from junk mail in “time capsules” to small talk to newspaper front pages and movie star publicity shots to 24 hours of the Empire State Building.

We all know that nothing lasts. But at least we can make a cool and funny exhibit of it.

I’m serious. God likes change and a joke. God loves CBGB’s.

Richard Hell, a musician, is the author of the novel “Godlike” and the film critic for BlackBook magazine.