October 6th, 2006

Chris Keeley

Tatiana Riabouchinska, 1944

The Kinsey Institute is now accepting submissions for its second annual juried erotic art show.

gpl1118-4

Kinsey Institute erotic art show: call for entries

Cory Silverberg, the Sexuality editor for About.com, tells BoingBoing:
The Kinsey Institute is now accepting submissions for its second annual juried erotic art show. The competition is open to all artists 18 years of age and older. Entries must be original works in the following categories: painting, drawing, printmaking, photography, sculpture, ceramics, fibers, or mixed media.
Link to more about the show. A PDF brochure is here. Deadline: February 5, 2007. Image: Link to full-size. A portrait of ballerina Tatiana Riabouchinska, 1944, by photographer George Platt Lynes (1907-1955), United States. (Copyright © 2003 by the Estate of George Platt Lynes). From a previous Kinsey Institute gallery exhibit titled "George Balanchine and his Dancers: The Ballet Photographs of George Platt Lynes."

posted by Xeni Jardin

Chris Keeley

Thomas' most provocative stunt may have come earlier this year, when he helped a bunch of teenaged s

a huge ghetto-blaster playing Zimbabwe's health minister making serious allegations about Nestle's baby-milk marketing methods

Peace prankster Mark Thomas helps nail 'net arms dealers

Excerpt from a post on Defensetech blog:

South London comedian Mark Thomas has always been a rather unusually political gag man -- leading protests, giving out leading spies' cell phone numbers, launching one-man WMD inspections, showing up at a Nestle factory "dressed as a huge teddy bear, and then produc[ing] a huge ghetto-blaster playing Zimbabwe's health minister making serious allegations about Nestle's baby-milk marketing methods." Think Michael Moore meets Sy Hersh. But way more pissed off.

 

Thomas' most provocative stunt may have come earlier this year, when he helped a bunch of teenaged schoolgirls set up an online arms dealership. Before long, they were pricing out tanks, negotiating for grenade launchers, and -- in his words -- buying up stun batons and other "equipment intended for torture or ill-treatment."

It was enough to get Parliament involved. MPs "praised comedian Mark Thomas for unearthing evidence of stun batons being sold through websites in the UK," according to the BBC. And the politicians began leaning on the trade and defense ministries to do something about the sales.

Yesterday, they did. "Two men have been arrested during raids by police investigating the sale of military weapons over the internet," the Times of London reports. "The men, aged 61 and 40 years old, were detained when more than 40 police officers swooped in on two properties in Kent early this morning. Both men were arrested on suspicion of possessing prohibited weapons."

"Mark Thomas, the stand-up comedian, has done more to expose illegal arms deals than the Ministry of Defence, the Export Control Organisation and HM Revenue and Customs put together," the Guardian proclaims, "simply by searching the internet and the trade press and attending the arms fairs the British government hosts."

Link (Thanks, Noah Shachtman)

posted by Xeni Jardin 

http://www.defensetech.org/archives/002824.html

Chris Keeley

(no subject)

The American Indian Movement of Colorado (Colorado AIM) has rooted its political, social, cultural and economic program in four basic, essential, and non-negotiable principles: Spirituality, Sovereignty/Self-determination, Support and Sobriety. 

http://www.coloradoaim.org/

http://www.transformcolumbusday.org/

Challenging Columbus Day: Denver Organizers Discuss Why They Protest the Holiday

Friday, October 6th, 2006

http://www.democracynow.org/article.pl?sid=06/10/06/1350258

Monday is known as Columbus Day, which is supposed to commemorate the arrival of Christopher Columbus to the so-called "new world" in 1492. But the holiday has long caused anger amongst people of color, especially Native Americans, who object to honoring a man who opened the door to European colonization, the exploitation of native peoples and the slave trade. We talk to Glenn Morris of the American Indian Movement of Colorado and Glenn Spagnuolo of Progressive Italians Transforming the Columbus Day Holiday.

 

The first state commemoration of Columbus Day was in Colorado and when our "Breaking the Sound Barrier" tour visited the state earlier this month - I sat down with two activists who were working to transform the holiday. Glenn Morris is a member of the Leadership Council of the American Indian Movement of Colorado, an Attorney and Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Colorado at Denver. Glenn Spagnuolo is a member of Transform Columbus Day Alliance and the Director of PITCH - Progressive Italians Transforming the Columbus Day Holiday.

 


http://www.democracynow.org/print.pl?sid=06/10/06/1350258

Chris Keeley

Eriksson, his court file has been sealed and he is now being held in a special segregated section of

Eriksson went from languishing in a European jail cell to making millions as a tech executive to, even more improbably, becoming deputy commissioner of antiterrorism for an obscure Southern California transit police force.

http://wired.com/wired/archive/14.10/gizmondo_pr.html

Gizmondo's Spectacular Crack-up


This month's Wired Magazine includes a feature about the gaming gadget company that continued to live la vida high-burnrate long after their mobile device bombed... then came that mysterious, high-speed Ferrari crash on PCH.

Wired editor Robert Capps tells BoingBoing,

We recruited investigative reporter Randall Sullivan (who literally wrote the book on the Biggie Smalls murder/Rampart scandal) and commissioned famed comic book artist Jae Lee to illustrate the piece (Captain America, Fantastic-4, the Hulk, X-Men, Spiderman, and is illustrating Steven King's Dark Tower -- some say he's the next Frank Miller).

Snip from Sullivan's piece:

The crash became an instant media sensation. In Los Angeles, the destruction of the rare million-dollar Ferrari - and the strange story that rose from the wreckage - dominated local radio talk shows and TV newscasts for days. For most, it was just another diversion, the newest twist on the high-speed-chase formula the city loves. But the public attention would spell disaster for a handful of people connected to Eriksson, many of them fellow participants in one of the biggest debacles in the history of the videogame industry: the epic meltdown of Gizmondo Europe, Eriksson's former company.

In the early 2000s, Gizmondo rose to prominence as the maker of a handheld gaming device designed to compete with Nintendo's DS and Sony's PlayStation Portable. The company touted its gadget as the next big thing in pocket electronics and, at one point, talked of moving half a million units in just a few months. But critics panned the device, and it failed to entice many customers. A month before Eriksson went off the road, Gizmondo declared bankruptcy, having hemorrhaged nearly $400 million in less than four years.

It might have ended there, another high-flying company with big ambitions and a lousy product. But the crash put a spotlight on Eriksson and raised a series of questions: Who is he? What kind of person drives nearly 200 mph on a coastal highway? The answers led to even more puzzles. In just a few years, it seems, Eriksson went from languishing in a European jail cell to making millions as a tech executive to, even more improbably, becoming deputy commissioner of antiterrorism for an obscure Southern California transit police force. Before ­Eriksson lost control of his Ferrari in Malibu, no one in the US really cared about his strange story. But after the supercar came apart, Eriksson would find every inch of his life under scrutiny by the LA County Sheriff's Department, federal law-enforcement officers, and the media. That's when Eriksson and a tangle of cohorts would find out just how large a little bump could loom.

Link