September 17th, 2006

Chris Keeley

Brady Kiesling Receives Kennan Award at Princeton

Brady Kiesling Receives Kennan Award at Princeton

WAR IN IRAQ
*Former diplomat lauded for anti-war position*
By Lisa Bendele / Princetonian Staff Writer

J. Brady Kiesling, the U.S. diplomat who publicly resigned his post in
2003 after disagreeing with President Bush's foreign policy, was awarded
the George F. Kennan Distinguished Peace-Leadership award Wednesday at a
ceremony in McCormick Hall.

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Chris Keeley

From personal experience

From personal experience

Subject:        From personal experience
Date:   Fri, 15 Sep 2006 09:58:03 EDT
From:  Ray Close
To:     undisclosed-recipients:;

Dear Friends:

A few years ago many of us watched with acute anxiety the phony build-up
to war with Iraq.  I, as one among many, gave numerous speeches and
wrote many op-ed protests, most of which ended up in some editor's trash
basket.  The alarmist tone of my speeches at university forums, churches
and foreign policy study groups created quite a stir, but prompted as
much protest as praise. I was often told by well-meaning friends that I
was being silly to worry so much. Some of those who shared my conviction
that war in Iraq would turn into a military quagmire and a political
disaster assured me that Bush's saber-rattling was all bluff, and that
he would never be stupid enough to disregard the wise counsel of Bush 41
veterans.  Many of those who were certain that war was indeed coming, on
the other hand, relied on neocon boasts to assure me that the results of
an invasion would be the cake-walk that those vainglorious blowhards
predicted it would be.  So the protests of the large fraternity of
veteran Middle East experts proved, in the end, to be pathetically
impotent  --- much too little and much too late to avert calamity.  A
great many innocent people are dead as a result.

 _ Let's not let that happen again_.

We cannot be sure that Bush will blunder into another major Middle East
war, but we cannot safely assume that he has learned any lessons from
recent experience.  The disaster this time would make the Iraq fiasco
look like a Sunday School picnic!

Ray Close
15 September 2006
Chris Keeley

New Clues in the Plame Mystery--Robert Parry in Consortium News--9/15/06

New Clues in the Plame Mystery--Robert Parry in Consortium News--9/15/06

*New Clues in the Plame Mystery*
  By Robert Parry
  Consortium News

  Friday 15 September 2006

  A well-placed conservative source has added an important clue to the
mystery of the Bush administration's "outing" of CIA officer Valerie
Plame after her husband, former Ambassador Joseph Wilson, became one of
the first Establishment figures to accuse George W. Bush of having
"twisted" intelligence to justify the Iraq War.

  The source, who knows both White House political adviser Karl Rove
and former Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage, told me that the
two men are much closer than many Washington insiders understand, that
they developed a friendship and a working relationship when Bush was
recruiting Colin Powell to be Secretary of State.

  In those negotiations, Armitage stood in for Powell and Rove
represented Bush - and after that, the two men provided a back channel
for sensitive information to pass between the White House and the State
Department, the source said.

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Chris Keeley

Robert Parry on Press Handling of Plame Case--9/14/06

Robert Parry on Press Handling of Plame Case--9/14/06

U.S. Press Bigwigs Screw Up, Again

By Robert Parry
September 14, 2006

So, right-wing columnist Robert Novak now says that Richard Armitage,
Novak’s initial source on the identity of CIA officer Valerie Plame,
wasn’t just some loose-lipped gossip blurting out her name, but rather
that Armitage urged Novak to write about Plame’s alleged role in her
husband’s fact-finding trip to Niger.

In a Sept. 14 column, Novak calls Armitage’s recent depiction of their
July 2003 conversation “deceptive” for suggesting that Armitage’s
leaking of Plame’s CIA identity was innocent and inadvertent, when Novak
recalled it as intentional and even calculating.

Yet, for the past two weeks, major Washington journalists have been
treating Armitage’s account as the gospel truth and, further, as proof
that George W. Bush’s White House had gotten a bum rap on the Plame-leak
scandal.

This misplaced “conventional wisdom” extended from the Washington Post’s
editorial pages to virtually every major TV chat show – and even touched
off another round of personal attacks by Bush allies against Plame’s
husband, former U.S. Ambassador Joseph Wilson, for having dared to stand
up to the President over his false claims that Iraq sought uranium ore
from Niger.
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