July 28th, 2006

Chris Keeley

Psychological warfare

Psychological warfare

http://www.salon.com/news/feature/2006/07/26/interrogation/

Psychological warfare

Angered that their professional organization has adopted a policy condoning psychologists' participation in "war on terror" interrogations, many psychologists are vowing to stage a battle royal at the APA's annual meeting.

By Mark Benjamin

Jul. 26, 2006 | The 150,000-member American Psychological Association is facing an internal revolt over its year-old policy that condones the participation of psychologists in the interrogations of prisoners during the Bush administration's "war on terror."

Last summer, the APA adopted new ethical principles drafted by a task force of 10 psychologists, who were selected by the organization's leadership. That controversial task-force report, which is now official APA policy, stated that psychologists participating in terror-related interrogations are fulfilling "a valuable and ethical role to assist in protecting our nation, other nations, and innocent civilians from harm."

But Salon has learned that six of the 10 psychologists on the task force have close ties to the military. The names and backgrounds of the task force participants were not made public by the APA; Salon obtained them from congressional sources. Four of the psychologists who crafted the permissive policy were involved with the handling of detainees at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, at Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq, or served with the military in Afghanistan -- all environments where serious cases of abuse have been documented.

APA president Gerald Koocher, who handpicked the task-force members along with the organization's former president Ronald Levant, said in an interview that the psychologists' military and national-security backgrounds did not raise conflict of interest or broader questions about the task force and its report. He defended choosing psychologists with such backgrounds, saying "they had special knowledge to contribute."

The 10-member task force enunciated the new principles for interrogations in a June 2005 report. The 11 pages of ethical obligations include 12 statements on interrogations, including one directing psychologists to report abuse and remember that suspects may be innocent. But detractors say its ban on "torture or other cruel, inhuman, or degrading treatment" is pro forma, an insufficient safeguard in the post-9/11 atmosphere.

Critics of the APA's interrogation policy are planning an all-out assault during the organization's annual meeting Aug. 10-13 in New Orleans, using tactics that include taking out a full-page advertisement in the local newspaper.

Opponents argue that when psychologists use their technical training to help break down the resistance of a prisoner, they are performing in a role diametrically at odds with their professional mission to serve as a healer. "I do not believe that psychologists should be involved in interrogations which are intrinsically coercive and inherently harmful to the person being interrogated," said Steven Reisner, a psychologist and senior faculty member at Columbia University's International Trauma Studies Program.

Joining in this chorus of dissent, former APA president Philip Zimbardo said psychologists used "the wrong model" to come up with the interrogation ethics principles. As the architect of a famous 1971 Stanford prison experiment in which students who were instructed to pretend they were guards in a mock prison quickly began to exhibit sadistic behavior, Zimbardo has more than a passing familiarity with the dynamics of cruelty. He warned against "abandoning the high moral ground in unquestioned support for ideological banners of 'national security.'"

Reisner said in an interview that the revelations of the close ties between the Department of Defense and a majority of psychologists on the task force would help galvanize opposition to the policy. The biographies of the task force members underscore these extensive and questionable connections.  ......

http://www.salon.com/news/feature/2006/07/26/interrogation/print.html

Chris Keeley

the term “international terrorism” means activities that

the term “international terrorism” means activities that

http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/html/uscode18/usc_sec_18_00002331----000-.html

iii) to affect the conduct of a government by mass destruction, assassination, or kidnapping; and 

TITLE 18 > PART I > CHAPTER 113B > § 2331 Prev | Next

 

§ 2331. Definitions

 

How Current is This?

 

As used in this chapter—
(1) the term “international terrorism” means activities that—
(A) involve violent acts or acts dangerous to human life that are a violation of the criminal laws of the United States or of any State, or that would be a criminal violation if committed within the jurisdiction of the United States or of any State;
(B) appear to be intended—
(i) to intimidate or coerce a civilian population;
(ii) to influence the policy of a government by intimidation or coercion; or
(iii) to affect the conduct of a government by mass destruction, assassination, or kidnapping; and
(C) occur primarily outside the territorial jurisdiction of the United States, or transcend national boundaries in terms of the means by which they are accomplished, the persons they appear intended to intimidate or coerce, or the locale in which their perpetrators operate or seek asylum;
(2) the term “national of the United States” has the meaning given such term in section 101(a)(22) of the Immigration and Nationality Act;
(3) the term “person” means any individual or entity capable of holding a legal or beneficial interest in property;
(4) the term “act of war” means any act occurring in the course of—
(A) declared war;
(B) armed conflict, whether or not war has been declared, between two or more nations; or
(C) armed conflict between military forces of any origin; and
(5) the term “domestic terrorism” means activities that—
(A) involve acts dangerous to human life that are a violation of the criminal laws of the United States or of any State;
(B) appear to be intended—
(i) to intimidate or coerce a civilian population;
(ii) to influence the policy of a government by intimidation or coercion; or
(iii) to affect the conduct of a government by mass destruction, assassination, or kidnapping; and
(C) occur primarily within the territorial jurisdiction of the United States.

 

Chris Keeley

Both girls had been "bagging" - inhaling mothball fumes - after encouragement from classmates.

huffing mothballs to get high resulted in a horrid rash, "unsteady gait," and "mental sluggishness.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/5219646.stm

clothes moth - (C) Science Photo Library
Mothballs are used to protect clothes from moth larvae

Huffing mothballs

An 18-year-old in Boston was hospitalized after her secret habit of huffing mothballs to get high resulted in a horrid rash, "unsteady gait," and "mental sluggishness. Turns out that her twin was also "bagging." Physicians report on these cases in the New England Journal of Medicine and suggest that the activity may be more common than people think. From the BBC News:
It was discovered that the girls had been using the mothballs as a recreational drug when doctors found a bag of mothballs stashed in her room while she was being treated at the Hospital of Timone in Marseille.

Both girls had been "bagging" - inhaling mothball fumes - after encouragement from classmates.

The twin who was sickest had also been chewing half a mothball a day for two months.

She continued her habit in hospital because she did not think her symptoms were linked to the mothballs.
Link
Chris Keeley

I just had to get something to protect myself," she says

Linda O'Neill's hands are shaking as she aims her brand new gun at the target

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/5223944.stm

Photo-fit of the 'Baseline Killer'
The 'Baseline Killer' - police do not know if this photo-fit is accurate

She shoots. She misses. It is hardly surprising. At the age of 41, she has never owned a weapon before - in fact she has never even touched a gun - but this week she spent more than $500 (£270) on a Glock 9mm pistol. 

He is believed to be operating entirely separately from the Baseline Killer - shooting human beings and animals randomly from his vehicle. He has taken the lives of at least five people.

Chris Keeley

Anatomy of a Pygmie

this Chain of the Creation, as an intermediate Link between an Ape and a Man, I would place our Pygmie

http://bibliodyssey.blogspot.com/2006/07/anatomy-of-pygmie.html

Anatomy of a Pygmie book

These beautiful illustrations are from a first edition copy of Edward Tyson's 1699 book Orang-Outang, sive Homo Sylvestris: or, the Anatomy of a Pygmie compared with that of a Monkey, an Ape, and a Man. This rare work is up for auction on eBay today. With only 8 hours left, the current bid is $2,275. The BibliOdyssey blog puts the book and Tyson in context.
 Blogger 1717 1584 1600 Anatomy-Of-A-Pygmy-G  Blogger 1717 1584 1600 Anatomy-Of-A-Pygmy-D
From the text of Anatomy of a Pygmie:
"I take him to be wholly a Brute, tho' in the formation of the Body, and in the Sensitive or Brutal Soul, it may be, more resembling a Man, than any other Animal; so that in this Chain of the Creation, as an intermediate Link between an Ape and a Man, I would place our Pygmie."
Link 

“one would be apt to think, that since there is so great a disparity
between the Soul of a Man, and a Brute, the Organ likewise in
which ’tis placed should be very different too.”




http://bibliodyssey.blogspot.com/2006/07/anatomy-of-pygmie.html
Chris Keeley

Hezbollah Leader Hassan Nasrallah Talks With Former US Diplomats on Israel, Prisoners and Hezbollah’

Edward Peck. Former U.S. Chief of Mission in Iraq and ambassador to Mauritania. He served as deputy director of the White House Task Force on Terrorism in the Reagan Administration

a number of countries that have been involved in such activities. Ours is one of them. Israel is another. And so, the terrorist, of course, is in the eye of the beholder.

NATIONAL EXCLUSIVE: Hezbollah Leader Hassan Nasrallah Talks With Former US Diplomats on Israel, Prisoners and Hezbollah’s Founding

Friday, July 28th, 2006

http://www.democracynow.org/article.pl?sid=06/07/28/1440244

 

The US government considers Hezbollah a terrorist organization, but several former former US diplomats sat down with the group’s leader, Hassan Nasrallah, in Lebanon earlier this year. In a US national exclusive, we play excerpts of the interview, and speak to former US Ambassador and White House Terrorism Task Force Director Edward Peck, who took part in the meeting. [includes rush transcript]

 


Sheik Hassan Nasrallah is the leader of the Lebanese militant group Hezbollah. Although the United States considers Hezbollah a terrorist organization, three former U.S. diplomats had a chance to meet with Nasrallah this past February in Lebanon. The diplomats were members of a delegation organized by the Council for the National Interest.
During the meeting, Nasrallah discussed Hezbollah’s strategy to free Lebanese prisoners being held in Israel. He also spoke about the origins of Hezbollah, and recounted an event that is back in the news this week—Israel’s bombing of a UN observation post in the southern Lebanese town of Qana in 1996 which killed 106 Lebanese refugees.
One of the retired diplomats who met with Nasrallah in February was Edward Peck - he joins us from our Washington studio. Edward Peck is the former U.S. chief of mission in Iraq and ambassador to Mauritania. He served as the deputy director of the White House Task Force on Terrorism in the Reagan administration.

 

  • Edward Peck. Former U.S. Chief of Mission in Iraq and ambassador to Mauritania. He served as deputy director of the White House Task Force on Terrorism in the Reagan Administration.
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Chris Keeley

U.S. Code Title 18, Section 2331

U.S. Code Title 18, Section 2331

http://caselaw.lp.findlaw.com/casecode/uscodes/18/parts/i/chapters/113b/sections/section_2331.html


U.S. Code as of: 01/19/04
Section 2331. Definitions
      As used in this chapter - 
        (1) the term "international terrorism" means activities that - 
          (A) involve violent acts or acts dangerous to human life that
        are a violation of the criminal laws of the United States or of
        any State, or that would be a criminal violation if committed
        within the jurisdiction of the United States or of any State;
          (B) appear to be intended - 
            (i) to intimidate or coerce a civilian population;
            (ii) to influence the policy of a government by
          intimidation or coercion; or
            (iii) to affect the conduct of a government by mass
          destruction, assassination, or kidnapping; and

          (C) occur primarily outside the territorial jurisdiction of
        the United States, or transcend national boundaries in terms of
        the means by which they are accomplished, the persons they
        appear intended to intimidate or coerce, or the locale in which
        their perpetrators operate or seek asylum;

        (2) the term "national of the United States" has the meaning
      given such term in section 101(a)(22) of the Immigration and
      Nationality Act;
        (3) the term "person" means any individual or entity capable of
      holding a legal or beneficial interest in property;
        (4) the term "act of war" means any act occurring in the course
      of - 
          (A) declared war;
          (B) armed conflict, whether or not war has been declared,
        between two or more nations; or
          (C) armed conflict between military forces of any origin; and

        (5) the term "domestic terrorism" means activities that - 
          (A) involve acts dangerous to human life that are a violation
        of the criminal laws of the United States or of any State;
          (B) appear to be intended - 
            (i) to intimidate or coerce a civilian population;
            (ii) to influence the policy of a government by
          intimidation or coercion; or
            (iii) to affect the conduct of a government by mass
          destruction, assassination, or kidnapping; and

          (C) occur primarily within the territorial jurisdiction of
        the United States.


Chris Keeley

Such dirty pretty things

Robert Mapplethorpe photographed florid penises and penile flowers, leather-clad satyrs and frothy socialites



Such dirty pretty things

Equally at home in downtown fetish bars and stylish uptown parties, Robert Mapplethorpe epitomised the decadence of 1980s New York. He died of Aids in 1989, but his perversely beautiful photographs live on, and are again on show in Britain. Peter Conrad meets his brother, lawyer and assistant and explores the legacy of his cruel and unusual relationships

Peter Conrad
Sunday July 23, 2006

Observer

Robert Mapplethorpe photographed florid penises and penile flowers, leather-clad satyrs and frothy socialites. He was equally entranced by raunch and glamour, by the danger of a sexual underworld and the pampered allure of affluence. He commuted between waterfront dives in Greenwich Village, where he recruited performers for his sadomasochistic tableaux, and the salons of rich crones on Park Avenue, who enjoyed the sulphurous whiff of decadence he brought to their parties. In 1969 his friend Patti Smith wheedled a free room for him at the Chelsea Hotel, offering the prospect of future fame as collateral. When he died of Aids in 1989, the proceeds from sales of his prints left an estate worth millions of dollars. Mapplethorpe's career scaled the ladder of the Manhattan grid. Following his tracks last week, I began downtown in a dim, sweltering bar on the Bowery, then advanced uptown to a law office behind St Patrick's Cathedral, where the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation has its headquarters in an environment euphemised by thick carpets and the soothing whisper of air-conditioning. A gulf divides the two locations, measuring the disputed legacy of the man and the artist.

 

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Chris Keeley

the Las Vegas ordinance is believed to be the first to explicitly make it an offense to feed “the in

Violating the ordinance is a misdemeanor, and can be punished by a fine of up to $1,000 or a jail term of up to six months, or both. Diana Paul, a spokeswoman for the city, said the police would begin enforcing it after briefings from city lawyers.

July 28, 2006

Las Vegas Makes It Illegal to Feed Homeless in Parks

LAS VEGAS, July 21 — Gail Sacco pulled green grapes, bread, lunch meat and, of course in this blazing heat, bottles of water from a cardboard box. A dozen homeless people rose from shady spots in the surrounding city park and snatched the handouts from her.

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