July 2nd, 2006

Chris Keeley

The accepted scientific definition of déjà vu, put forth in 1983 by a Seattle-based psychiatrist nam

Translated literally from the French as "already seen," déjà vu can be, for some people, a strange and unsettling experience; for others, thrilling or even spiritual. Occurring at seemingly random times, lasting from a few seconds to a few minutes, it often comes with a feeling of approaching premonition. Not only does the situation feel familiar, but a vision of the future also seems just beyond the searchlights of your conscious mind.

Photomontage by Gerald Slota

The accepted scientific definition of déjà vu, put forth in 1983 by a Seattle-based psychiatrist named Vernon Neppe, is "any subjectively inappropriate impression of familiarity of the present experience with an undefined past."

Déjà Vu, Again and Again

Pat Shapiro is a vibrant woman of 77, with silver hair, animated blue eyes and a certain air of elegance about her. She lives with her husband, Don, in a white two-story Colonial in Dover, Mass., a picturesque town set on the Charles River east of Boston. After 56 years of marriage, Pat and Don have a playful repartee that borders on "Ozzie and Harriet," and her still-sharp mind is on display in their running banter. "Don, we haven't had an 'icebox' in years," she'll say, interrupting one of his winding stories. "It's called a refrigerator."

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Chris Keeley

Asymmetry also pervades the music he makes on his first solo album, "The Eraser" (XL), and the music

Asymmetry also pervades the music he makes on his first solo album, "The Eraser" (XL), and the music he has made for more than a decade with Radiohead, rock's most experimental Top 10 band.

Peter DaSilva for The New York Times

Thom Yorke at the Greek Theater in Berkeley, Calif.



With Radiohead, and Alone, the Sweet Malaise of Thom Yorke

THOM YORKE is a study in asymmetry. A small, wiry man in neatly patched blue jeans, gray T-shirt and dark blazer, he sits with wary courtesy for an interview in a midtown Manhattan hotel room that attempts a sleekly pretentious minimalism, "but on the cheap," he says with a snicker.

Mr. Yorke's coppery blond hair is cut at precisely unbalanced angles, and in his sharp, foxlike face his right eye is clearly larger than his left. His forehead occasionally creases above his left eyebrow, giving him a slightly conspiratorial look. Asymmetry also pervades the music he makes on his first solo album, "The Eraser" (XL), and the music he has made for more than a decade with Radiohead, rock's most experimental Top 10 band.

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Chris Keeley

L.H.O.O.Q.

It might seem to be possible to look further to Marcel Duchamp as a forerunner of mailart in terms of the anti-art and antiestablishment agenda that he demonstrated in his subversive and abusive defacing of a postcard of the Mona Lisa, 'L.H.O.O.Q.' 1919.3 Yet Duchamp and the Dadaists readily exhibited in the established art marketing system, thereby supporting the very institutions that they purported to attack. Mailart however has always eschewed art marketing, even if mailartists have at times - or as parallel activity - used the art marketing system for their non-mailart activity. Whilst many artists have used the postal system, there are no contenders for the position that Johnson holds as originator of the system of exchange that is mailart.


Chris Keeley

LAST STAND

The lesson they took from Iraq is that there should have been more troops on the ground”—an impossibility in Iran, because of the overextension of American forces in Iraq—“so the air war in Iran will be one of overwhelming force.

LAST STAND
by SEYMOUR M. HERSH
The military’s problem with the President’s Iran policy.
Issue of 2006-07-10
Posted 2006-07-03

On May 31st, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice announced what appeared to be a major change in U.S. foreign policy. The Bush Administration, she said, would be willing to join Russia, China, and its European allies in direct talks with Iran about its nuclear program. There was a condition, however: the negotiations would not begin until, as the President put it in a June 19th speech at the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, “the Iranian regime fully and verifiably suspends its uranium enrichment and reprocessing activities.” Iran, which has insisted on its right to enrich uranium, was being asked to concede the main point of the negotiations before they started. The question was whether the Administration expected the Iranians to agree, or was laying the diplomatic groundwork for future military action. In his speech, Bush also talked about “freedom for the Iranian people,” and he added, “Iran’s leaders have a clear choice.” There was an unspoken threat: the U.S. Strategic Command, supported by the Air Force, has been drawing up plans, at the President’s direction, for a major bombing campaign in Iran.

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