June 26th, 2006

Chris Keeley

Mr. Buffett plans to give away 85 percent of his fortune, or about $37.4 billion, all in Berkshire s

Buffett to Give Bulk of His Fortune to Gates Charity

Warren E. Buffett, the chairman of Berkshire Hathaway Inc. and one of the world's wealthiest men, plans to donate the bulk of his $44 billion fortune to the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and four other philanthropies starting in July.

The donations, outlined in a series of letters that Mr. Buffett released yesterday and will execute today, represent a singular and historic act of charitable giving that vaults him into the top tier of industrialists and entrepreneurs like Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller Sr., Henry Ford, J. Paul Getty, W. K. Kellogg and Mr. Gates himself, all men whose fortunes have endowed some of the world's richest private foundations.

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Chris Keeley

an Australian woman who swallowed 320 condoms full of heroin in an attempt to smuggle the drug into

The charge carries a maximum penalty of $825,000 and/or life imprisonment.

Customs officers in Sydney have intercepted an Australian woman who swallowed 320 condoms full of heroin in an attempt to smuggle the drug into the country.

The 25-year-old Australian was stopped as she came off a flight from Singapore last Sunday, June 18, on suspicion that she was concealing drugs internally.

She was taken to hospital for a medical examination, which revealed a large number of items in her stomach, the Australian Federal Police said.

The woman has been in hospital under medical supervision while the condoms, containing approximately 300 grams of heroin, passed from her system.

She has been charged with importing a marketable quantity of a border-controlled drug and was due to appear in Parramatta Bail Court on Sunday.

The charge carries a maximum penalty of $825,000 and/or life imprisonment.

Chris Keeley

Cabinet Card Portrait

Tucker also published other works considered radical at the time, such as Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass, Tolstoy's Kreutzer Sonata, and Oscar Wilde's Ballad of Reading Gaol

Charles Darwin
Digital ID: 1158345

Charles Darwin 

Cabinet Card Portraits in the Collection of Radical Publisher Benjamin R. Tucker

Henrik Ibsen | Verso (Cabinet Card Portrait, Benjamin R. Tucker papers, 1860s-1970s, bulk (1870s-1930s)). From Cabinet Card Portraits in the Collection of Radical Publisher Benjamin R. Tucker. "...Benjamin Ricketson Tucker (1854-1939) published The Radical Review from 1877 to 1878, and the anarchist magazine Liberty from 1881 to 1908. The journal’s banner read 'Liberty – Not the daughter but the mother of order,' signaling Tucker's stance as a philosophical or individualist anarchist. His magazine was the first to publish George Bernard Shaw in the U.S., and to translate Pierre Joseph Proudhon. Tucker also published other works considered radical at the time, such as Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass, Tolstoy's Kreutzer Sonata, and Oscar Wilde's Ballad of Reading Gaol."
Chris Keeley

Norquist wrote: "When I have funding, I will ask Karl Rove for a date with the president. Karl has a

Norquist Secured White House Meeting For Abramoff Client
Meanwhile, the e-mails also reveal Norquist was able to arrange a newly disclosed meeting between President Bush and Abramoff’s tribal clients in 2002. Previous documents have already shown Bush met an Abramoff client the year before. In the newly disclosed e-mail, Norquist asks Abramoff if his clients could contribute $100,000 to fund a Washington trip of state legislators and tribal leaders who had passed resolutions backed by the White House. Norquist wrote: "When I have funding, I will ask Karl Rove for a date with the president. Karl has already said 'yes' in principle and knows you organized this last time and hope to this year." Norquist delivered on his promise. Abramoff’s clients met President Bush for the second time; and the clients subsequently donated to Norquist’s ATR.

Chris Keeley

While many in the treatment field have long called addiction a "disease," they've used the word in v

The Answer is Spiritual Not Chemical - Chris Says!

June 25, 2006

An Anti-Addiction Pill?

Last month, the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology was host to a conference about addiction for a small, invitation-only crowd of neuroscientists, clinicians and public policy makers. It was an unusual gathering. Addiction conferences are usually sober affairs, but M.I.T. offered a lavish cocktail reception (with an open bar, no less). More important, the conference was a celebration of the new ways scientists and addiction researchers are conceptualizing, and seeking to treat, addiction. While many in the treatment field have long called addiction a "disease," they've used the word in vague and metaphorical ways, meaning everything from a disease of the mind to a disease of the spirit. Many assumed that an addict suffers from a brain-chemistry problem, but scientists had not been able to peer into our heads to begin to prove it.

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