June 12th, 2006

Chris Keeley

William Gibson blogging fiction excerpts

Vianca sat cross-legged on Tito’s floor, wearing a disposable hairnet and white knit cotton gloves, with his Sony plasma screen across her knees, going over it with an Armor All wipe. 

William Gibson blogging fiction excerpts

Since June 1, William GIbson has been posting irregular chunks of prose to his blog, stuff that appears to be excerpts from a novel-in-progress. It's fascinating stuff, little vignettes that hint at a really exciting bigger picture.
Vianca sat cross-legged on Tito’s floor, wearing a disposable hairnet and white knit cotton gloves, with his Sony plasma screen across her knees, going over it with an Armor All wipe. When she’d wiped it completely down, it would go back into its factory packaging, which in turn would be wiped down. Tito, in his own hairnet and gloves, sat opposite her, wiping the keys of his Casio. A carton of cleaning supplies had been waiting for them in the hall, beside a new and expensive-looking vacuum-cleaner Vianca said was German. Nothing came out of this vacuum but air, she said, so there would no stray hairs or other traces left behind. Tito had helped his cousin Eusebio with exactly this procedure, though Eusebio had mainly had books, each of which had needed, according to protocol, to be flipped through for forgotten insertions and then wiped. The reasons for Eusebio’s departure had never been made clear to him. That too was protocol.
Link 1, Link 2, Link 3 

http://www.williamgibsonbooks.com/blog/2006_06_01_archive.asp#115009429631653094
Chris Keeley

Look at Me

Lee Miller: A Life by Carolyn Burke reviewed by Elissa Schappell. 

Look at Me 

David E. Scherman/From "Lee Miller: A Life"

New York Times... Look at Me - Lee Miller: A Life by Carolyn Burke reviewed by Elissa Schappell. "...It seems fitting that Carolyn Burke, whose first biography corrected history's error of undervaluing the avant-garde poet and artist Mina Loy, has written 'Lee Miller: A Life.' Fitting, also, that she begins the tale of a forgotten visionary photographer who was muse and lover to some of the most influential artists of the early 20th century, as well as one of the few women able to transcend this role and become an artistic force in her own right, with Miller's birth as a muse."

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/01/08/books/review/08schappel.html?ex=1150257600&en=bff8a4ef15044d75&ei=5070

Chris Keeley

Psychopathia Sexualis

In this stand-alone short film adapted from the feature Psychopathia Sexualis a case of necrophilia is dramatized through Victorian-style shadow play, utilizing the actual confessions of the sexual criminal. Shadow puppetry designed by Jason Hines

http://www.kino.com/psychopathia/index.html

The Curious Passions of Sergeant Bertrand (QuickTime). "...In this stand-alone short film adapted from the feature Psychopathia Sexualis a case of necrophilia is dramatized through Victorian-style shadow play, utilizing the actual confessions of the sexual criminal. Shadow puppetry designed by Jason Hines." From Psychopathia Sexualis - a film by Bret Wood. "...Employing a complex multi-narrative structure, Psychopathia Sexualis dramatizes case histories of turn-of-the-century sexual deviance, drawn from the pages of Richard von Krafft-Ebing's notorious medical text."
Chris Keeley

Eugene Von Bruenchenhein

Eugene Von Bruenchenhein... Portrait of Marie in Sweater and Pearls (c. 1940s, Hand-tinted gelatin silver print, American Folk Art Museum, gift of Lewis and Jean Greenblatt).

American Folk Art Museum


ANIMALS APPEAR AS PLANTS—DWELLERS OF THE SEA

from FOLK ART REVEALED

Eugene Von Bruenchenhein (1910–1983)
Milwaukee
http://www.folkartmuseum.org/default.asp?id=958
1956
Paint on corregated cardboard
21 x 24 in.

American Folk Art Museum, Blanchard-Hill Collection, gift of M. Anne Hill and Edward V. Blanchard Jr., 1998.10.58

Chris Keeley

the Bush administration is considering keeping at least 50,000 troops in Iraq for years to come, pos

Iraqis Claim U.S. Soldiers Beat Zarqawi to Death
New Questions are being raised over the circumstances of the death of Abu Musab al-Zarqawi. U.S. military officials initially claimed that Zarqawi died when a U.S. F-16 dropped two 500 pound bombs on his hideout outside of the town of Hibhib. But on Friday the military admitted Zarqawi survived the initial bombing and was semi-conscious when Iraqi and U.S. officials arrived at the scene. The U.S. maintains he died on a stretcher while being treated by U.S. personnel. But an Iraqi police lieutenant told the Los Angeles Times that Zarqawi died after a U.S. soldier repeatedly stepped on his chest, causing blood to flow from his mouth and nose. The officer said U.S. troops removed Zarqawi from an Iraqi ambulance and placed him on the ground. Then a U.S. soldier tried to question Zarqawi and began stepping on his chest. Another Iraqi man who lived nearby told Associated Press Television News that he had witnessed Americans beating Zarqawi. He said "They stomped on his stomach and his chest until he died and blood came out of his nose.” The top American commander in Iraq on Sunday rejected these accounts saying they were "baloney.” General George Casey said, "the idea that there were people there beating him is just ludicrous." The U.S. military has finished an autopsy on Zarqawi but has not released the findings.

Bush Considers Keeping 50,000 Troops In Iraq Indefinitely
In other news on Iraq, President Bush is planning to meet today at Camp David with top military and civilian advisers today to discuss the future role of the United States in Iraq. This comes as the New York Times reports that the Bush administration is considering keeping at least 50,000 troops in Iraq for years to come, possibly for decades – just as it has in Korea.

GOP Lawmakers OK Permanent Military Bases in Iraq
Meanwhile on Capitol Hill, Republican lawmakers appear to be giving the Pentagon the go-ahead to build permanent military bases in Iraq. Last week lawmakers quietly removed a provision that would have blocked the military from establishing permanent bases in Iraq. Congresswoman Barbara Lee criticized the move. She said "The perception that the U.S. intends to occupy Iraq indefinitely is fueling the insurgency and making our troops more vulnerable.”