January 29th, 2006

Chris Keeley

His accurately reconstructed models - with their huge hooked bills, short legs and necks and rudimen

At the BONNI BENRUBI GALLERY, the bulky dodo bird, extinct since the 17th century, seems to be alive and well, at least as caught by the lens of the Finnish photographer HARRI KALLIO in its native habitat, the tropical island of Mauritius. His accurately reconstructed models - with their huge hooked bills, short legs and necks and rudimentary wings - frequent mountaintops, valleys and dense woodlands, blissfully undisturbed by the invasion of humans and imported animals like the hog that apparently led to their demise. 41 East 57th Street, Manhattan, (212) 888-6007, through April 1.
Chris Keeley

No one would deny either Marlowe's analytic gifts or his darkly satiric temperament, but they are pu


January 29, 2006
'Christopher Marlowe: Poet and Spy,' by Park Honan

Street-Fighting Man

PEOPLE who complain that we have so few biographical facts about Shakespeare, and use that lack of data as an excuse for indulging in fantasies about who "really" wrote his plays, should ponder the case of Christopher Marlowe (at one time a favorite candidate for that ghostwriter role), about whom even less is known. He flashed across the Tudor literary scene for a stunningly brief period, raising the standards of poetic achievement and transforming Elizabethan theater. Few pre-Shakespearean English plays still hold the stage; they include at least four of Marlowe's. In recent decades, "Tamburlaine the Great" (its two parts usually condensed into one evening), "The Jew of Malta," "Doctor Faustus" and "Edward II" have had regular revivals.

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