January 26th, 2006

Chris Keeley

Google's cacheing and displaying of millions of web-pages is legal.

Google Cache is legal

A court has ruled that Google's cacheing and displaying of millions of web-pages is legal. Google Cache is the service that offers to show you stored versions of the web-pages that turn up in the results for your Google searches. Until recently, no court had ruled on the legality of this, and it was unclear whether this would qualify as a "fair use." If not, Google and a number of other cacheing services (particularly the Internet Archive's Wayback Machine) would have been in deep trouble.

A district court in Nevada brought down the ruling yesterday, deciding that Google was not breaking the law because it honors the "robots.txt" and "nocache" headers, because it automatically caches without human intervention, because cacheing is a fair use, and because this activity falls into a copyright exemption called a "safe harbor."

Blake Field, an author and attorney, brought the copyright infringement lawsuit against Google after the search engine automatically copied and cached a story he posted on his website. The district court found that Mr. Field “attempted to manufacture a claim for copyright infringement against Google in hopes of making money from Google’s standard [caching] practice.” Google responded that its Google Cache feature, which allows Google users to link to an archival copy of websites indexed by Google, does not violate copyright law.

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Chris Keeley

Gonzales left immediately after his address without taking questions.

AG Gonzales' Defense Of U.S. Domestic Spy Program Draws Protests and Criticism from Law Professors, Students

Wednesday, January 25th, 2006

http://www.democracynow.org/article.pl?sid=06/01/25/155217

On Tuesday, Attorney General Alberto Gonzales appeared at Georgetown Law School to deliver an address defending the NSA domestic spy programs. During the course of his address, nearly 30 students stood up one-by-one and turned their back on Gonzales in protest. A panel of law professors addressed Gonzales’ speech, calling it illegal. We play excerpts of Gonzales’ speech and law professor David Cole responding. [includes rush transcript]


During Gonzales' speech, the protesting students stayed standing throughout the speech. Five students stood up and wore black hoods reminiscent of ones used at Abu Ghraib. The hooded students held a banner reading the words of Benjamin Franklin: “Those who would sacrifice liberties in the name of security deserve neither.” Third-year law student Devon Chaffee, said later, “We believe that as law students, we must stand up for the rule of law over the creation of a culture of fear.”

 

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Chris Keeley

Robot Bartender

A man enters a bar and orders a drink. The bar has a robot bartender. The robot serves him a perfectly prepared cocktail, and then asks him, "What's your IQ?" The man replies "150" and the robot proceeds to make conversation about quantum physics, string theory, atomic chemistry, etc. he customer is very impressed and thinks, "This is really cool."
He decides to test the robot. He walks out of the bar, turns around, and comes back in for another drink. Again, the robot serves him the drink and asks him, "What's your IQ?" The man responds, "100." Immediately the robot starts talking, but this time, about football, NASCAR, baseball, supermodels, etc.
Really impressed, the man leaves the bar and decides to give the robot one more test. He goes back in, the robot serves him and asks, "What's your IQ?" The man replies, "70." And the robot says, "So, you gonna vote for Bush again?"
Chris Keeley

The Telegraph has been ordered to pay Galloway’s legal costs and more than a quarter of a million do

Galloway Wins Libel Suit, Loses TV Reality Series
And anti-war British MP George Galloway continues to make news. On Wednesday, a British court upheld Galloway’s winning judgment in a libel suit he brought against the British newspaper the Daily Telegraph. In 2003, the Telegraph ran an article claiming Galloway received payments from the government of Saddam Hussein. The Telegraph has been ordered to pay Galloway’s legal costs and more than a quarter of a million dollars in damages.

  • George Galloway : "The bottom line is that nobody ever gave me any money for my work on Iraq except the newspapers which falsely alleged that someone else had done so. Now those newspapers have had to pay out millions of pounds in damages and costs in a whole series of libel actions and I think that really speaks for itself."

Hours after the verdict, the British Sun released a video from 1998 apparently showing Galloway smiling and shaking hands with Uday Hussein, the late of son of Saddam Hussein. And last night, Galloway learned he had been voted off of the British reality television program Big Brother. Galloway had drawn criticism for his participation in the show. During his three-week run, millions of viewers watched Galloway take part in such activities as dressing in a red leotard and lapping imaginary milk from a saucer like a cat. Galloway said he had appeared on the program to spread his anti-war message.
Chris Keeley

the image selected by Cartier-Bresson, Pound's wild hair, burning eyes and tense hands seem to speak

From This Decisive Moment On </nyt_headline>

PARIS, Jan. 25 — Henri Cartier-Bresson wasn't always more famous than those he photographed, but by midcareer he was certainly as renowned as many of the literary, artistic, fashion and movie figures before him. How did this affect the power relationship between recorder and recorded in what Cartier-Bresson liked to call a "duel without rules?"

 

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Chris Keeley

the U.S. has been accused of meddling in the Palestinian election

Hamas Wins Sweeping Victory in Palestinian Parliamentary Elections

Thursday, January 26th, 2006

http://www.democracynow.org/article.pl?sid=06/01/26/151247

In the Occupied Territories, unofficial results indicate Hamas has won a sweeping victory in the first Palestinian parliamentary elections in a decade. Israel and the United States have said they would not deal with a Palestinian Authority that includes Hamas. We speak with Mouin Rabbani, senior Middle East analyst with the International Crisis Group about the surprise result. [includes rush transcript]

 

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Chris Keeley

people like Zbigniew Brzezinski and our ambassador in Iraq now, Zalmay Khalilzad, both argued that K

How Israel and the United States Helped to Bolster Hamas

Thursday, January 26th, 2006

http://www.democracynow.org/article.pl?sid=06/01/26/151252

As Hamas wins an upset victory in the Palestinian parliamentary elections, we take a look at the little-known rise of the militant group with investigative journalist Robert Dreyfuss, author of the new book "Devil's Game: How the United States Helped Unleash Fundamentalist Islam." In it, Dreyfuss reveals how the U.S. looked the other way when Israel's secret service supported the creation of Hamas. [includes rush transcript]

 

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Chris Keeley

(no subject)

Pitt, Jolie at world forum
Pitt, Jolie at world forum
Brad Pitt, left, holds hands with his companion Angelina Jolie as they walk through the lobby at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, on Jan. 26. The second day of the World Economic Forum's annual meeting promised a blend of celebrity and brass tacks talk of the issues facing the global community, ranging from security against terror to advancing human rights and the struggle against poverty and disease.
(AP/Michel Euler)
Jan. 26, 2006

Chris Keeley

(no subject)

Author Frey on Oprah show
Author Frey on Oprah show
This photo provided by Harpo Productions shows Oprah Winfrey on Jan. 26 during her live television interview with James Frey, author of "A Million Little Pieces," in Chicago. Winfrey challenged Frey over his disputed memoir during the telecast, asking him to explain why he "felt the need to lie." Frey's story of substance abuse and recovery became one of the best-selling books of 2005 after Winfrey named it to her book club last fall, with countless addicts citing it as inspiration.
(AP/Harpo Productions, George Burns)
Jan. 26, 2006