January 4th, 2006

Chris Keeley

(no subject)

From: robert jacobs Mailed-By: hotmail.com
To: addicts
Date: Jan 4, 2006 2:26 AM
Subject: lovely photos
Mr. Keeley
 
I just wanted to say how much I liked your photography-- I just stumbled upon them whilst surfing the internet.
There's alot of loneliness in some of them but also beauty and dignity.... I share some of the same issues as some of your subjects.... I can really relate.
 
Anyway, thanks for your work.
 
Kindest Regards
 
RJ
Chris Keeley

Lobbyist Jack Abramoff admitted to defrauding at least four Native American tribes of tens of millio

The Biggest Congressional Scandal in Over a Century? GOP Lobbyist Jack Abramoff Pleads Guilty to Three Felony Counts

Wednesday, January 4th, 2006

http://www.democracynow.org/article.pl?sid=06/01/04/1524241

Lobbyist Jack Abramoff admitted to defrauding at least four Native American tribes of tens of millions of dollars, bribing government officials and evading taxes. Abramoff has reportedly agreed to testify against several members of Congress who received favors or donations from him or his clients. Washington analysts say the corruption scandal could take down as many as twelve lawmakers. We speak with Peter Stone, a staff reporter for the National Journal, about the details of the case. [includes rush transcript]


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Chris Keeley

The Wall Street Journal is reporting Abramoff says he has information that could implicate 60 lawmak

Congress on Edge As Abramoff Agrees to Testify About Widespread Corruption on Capitol Hill

Wednesday, January 4th, 2006

http://www.democracynow.org/article.pl?sid=06/01/04/1524246

We take a closer look at who benefited from their ties to Jack Abramoff inside Congress. The Wall Street Journal is reporting Abramoff says he has information that could implicate 60 lawmakers. One Republican lawmaker -- Congressman Robert Ney of Ohio -- has already been subpoenaed. We speak with researcher Judd Legum about the lawmakers involved. [includes rush transcript]

 

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Chris Keeley

tribes to make political donations to certain politicians and recommended they hire former aide of T

Native American Tribes Attempt to Recover After Being Defrauded of Tens of Millions by Abramoff

Wednesday, January 4th, 2006

http://www.democracynow.org/article.pl?sid=06/01/04/1524250

Former U.S. Senator Ben Nighthorse Campbell, who served as chair of the Senate Indian Affairs Committee that investigated the scandal, and Tigua tribal governor Arturo Senclair, of one of the Indian tribes defrauded by Abramoff, discuss the Native American tribes embroiled in the Abramoff scandal. They hired Abramoff to represent them in Washington regarding casino and gambling issues. As their lobbyist, Abramoff instructed the tribes to make political donations to certain politicians and recommended they hire former aide of Tom DeLay, Michael Scanlon, as their publicist. [includes rush transcript]

 

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Chris Keeley

She peered into the maze of apple-laden limbs and through a narrow opening saw in silhouette the fig

THE CRYPTOZOOLOGIST
by TONY EARLEY
Issue of 2006-01-09
Posted 2006-01-02

Fieldin was under round-the-clock hospice care, and the jagged, liquid rasp of his breathing made it almost impossible for Rose to think about anything other than his vain search for oxygen. Unable to sleep, she put on his old down jacket and stepped onto the back porch, closing the door quietly behind her. It was about two-thirty in the morning, the world silvered with frost. The orchard glittered in the harsh light of a near-full moon. The gnarled old apple trees seemed on the verge of movement, as if she had caught them marching in formation toward App Mountain, whose black shoulders sloped suddenly upward just beyond the last row of trees. Had she been in a more peaceful mood, she might have fetched her sketchbook and made notes about the shadows for painting later. Instead, she stared at the mountain and wondered, as she often did, if Wayne Lee Cowan was still alive. Cowan had set off a bomb behind an abortion clinic in Birmingham the year before, killing eleven people. Then he’d parked his truck on a Forest Service fire road and disappeared into these mountains. Nobody, at least nobody who was talking, had laid eyes on him since.

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Chris Keeley

Scarlett Johansson wears her blond hair up, which brings out the oval shape of her face and the soft

GAME PLAYING
by DAVID DENBY
“Match Point,” 
Issue of 2006-01-09
Posted 2006-01-02

You could say that Woody Allen, by shifting his milieu from New York’s Upper East Side to London’s elegant Belgravia, has not so much re-invented himself (as some have suggested) as gone back to the motherland of the Wasp good taste he’s always aspired to. But there’s no need to be rude. Whatever Allen’s needs or motives, a change of light and scenery was obviously good for him. His new movie, “Match Point,” devoted to lust, adultery, and murder, is the most vigorous thing he’s done in years. The beginning, however, is lame: we’re introduced to an Irish-born tennis pro, Chris Wilton (Jonathan Rhys Meyers), a very good player—he played Andre Agassi a couple of times—who is now teaching at a posh London club, where he meets Tom Hewett (Matthew Goode), the lanky, easygoing son of a wealthy family. Tom takes a shine to Chris, who comes from a poor background but has upwardly mobile tastes—he loves opera—and introduces him to his friends and relatives, including his sister, Chloe (Emily Mortimer). In the family box at Covent Garden, Chloe keeps shifting her gaze from “La Traviata” to the handsome young tennis player sitting behind her. Chris’s visit to the Hewett country estate follows soon after.

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