December 27th, 2005

Chris Keeley

What's wrong with giving up a little liberty if it protects me from death?"

Fear destroys what bin Laden could not

Robert Steinback of the Miami Herald wrote a stirring column about the Bush administration's horribly wrongheaded response to the tragedy of 9/11/
President Bush recently confirmed that he has authorized wiretaps against U.S. citizens on at least 30 occasions and said he'll continue doing it. His justification? He, as president -- or is that king? -- has a right to disregard any law, constitutional tenet or congressional mandate to protect the American people.

Is that America's highest goal -- preventing another terrorist attack? Are there no principles of law and liberty more important than this? Who would have remembered Patrick Henry had he written, "What's wrong with giving up a little liberty if it protects me from death?"

Link

 

http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/news/columnists/13487511.htm

 

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Chris Keeley

the principles of this vision, called positive psychology. By learning to express gratitude, to savo

Psychotherapy on the Road to ... Where? </nyt_headline>

ANAHEIM, Calif. - The small car careered toward a pile of barrels labeled "Danger TNT," then turned sharply, ramming through a mock brick wall and into a dark tunnel. A light appeared ahead, coming fast and head-on. A locomotive whistled.

"Uh-oh," said one of the passengers, Dr. Martin Seligman, a psychologist and a pioneer in the study of positive emotions.

But in a moment, the car scudded safely under the light, out through the swinging doors of Mr. Toad's Wild Ride and into the warm, clear light that seemed to radiate from the Southern California pavement.

"Well," Dr. Seligman said. "I don't know that I expected to be doing that."

One of several prominent therapists who agreed to visit Disneyland at the invitation of this reporter, Dr. Seligman was here in mid-December for a conference on the state of psychotherapy, its current challenges and its future. And a wild ride it was.

The question is, How to get to Tomorrowland?

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Chris Keeley

the station's large parabolic dishes secretly and silently sweep in millions of private telephone c

Profile of NSA "listening post" for communications spying


Snip from NYT story by James Bamford:

Deep in a remote, fog-layered hollow near Sugar Grove, W.Va., hidden by fortress-like mountains, sits the country's largest eavesdropping bug. Located in a "radio quiet" zone, the station's large parabolic dishes secretly and silently sweep in millions of private telephone calls and e-mail messages an hour.

Run by the ultrasecret National Security Agency, the listening post intercepts all international communications entering the eastern United States. Another N.S.A. listening post, in Yakima,Wash., eavesdrops on the western half of the country.

A hundred miles or so north of Sugar Grove, in Washington, the N.S.A. has suddenly taken center stage in a political firestorm. The controversy over whether the president broke the law when he secretly ordered the N.S.A. to bypass a special court and conduct warrantless eavesdropping on American citizens has even provoked some Democrats to call for his impeachment.

Link.

Above, a photo snipped from this related item on John Young's Cryptome today: Eyeballing Sugar Grove Echelon Station, with satellite photos and maps of the site profiled in the NYT piece.

posted by Xeni Jardin

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/12/25/weekinreview/25bamford.html?ex=1293166800&en=3d09922ebe6b2eac&ei=5090&partner=boingboing&emc=rss

Chris Keeley

Mary at 16 is also a "garbage head," meaning that she will ingest anything she thinks will give her

When Teenagers Abuse Prescription Drugs, the Fault May Be the Doctor's </nyt_headline>

Every Thursday evening, I counsel a group of teenagers with serious substance abuse problems. None of the youngsters elected to see me. Typically, they were caught using drugs, or worse, by their parents or a police officer and were then referred to my clinic.

To be sure, all the usual intoxicants - alcohol, marijuana, amphetamines, LSD and cocaine - are involved. But a new type of addiction has crept into the mix, controlled prescription drugs, including potent opiate painkillers, tranquilizers and stimulants used to treat attention deficit disorders.

This is hardly unique to my clinic. Several studies report that since 1992, the number of 12- to 17 -year-olds abusing controlled prescription drugs has tripled.

 

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Chris Keeley

International Dadaism Month in honor of the provocative, sometimes absurdist art movement that flowe

He Remembers Dada

When the City Commission holds its weekly meeting today in Lawrence, Kan., Mayor Boog Highberger plans to proclaim International Dadaism Month in honor of the provocative, sometimes absurdist art movement that flowered in the 1920's, The Associated Press reported. But in the spirit of an art movement that declared that "art is dead," the mayor has chosen not to specify a month for the observance. International Dadaism Month, he says, is Feb. 4, March 28, April 1, July 15, Aug. 2, 7, 16 and 26; Sept. 18 and 22, and Oct. 1, 17 and 26. How did he reach that conclusion? He rolled dice and picked numbers from a hat. "I just think it is good to acknowledge that there is a place for chance and nonsense in every healthy lifestyle," Mayor Highberger said. Not all members of the electorate agreed. "It sounds like a waste of time to me," said Joe Hutchens, a construction worker. "It seems like the City Commission would have something better to do than that."